Michael

By: Jane

Mar 09 2011

Category: Grieving

2 Comments

Aperture:f/2.8

Several of my friends are currently grieving. I originally wrote this about my son. I’ve changed a few of the words so that it will fit anyone’s circumstance. It sounds depressing at first reading. But it tries to give voice to what you may be feeling. And it does contain hope.
Shared with love.

How do you describe the emptiness of the first days of grieving?

You struggle to wrap your mind around present reality. He’s gone. Forever. He isn’t coming back.

You stare at his picture, to make sure you never forget what he looked like. You stare at his picture, trying to connect.

Eventually, you go back to your usual routine, and it is absolutely surreal.

You think about certain expressions that he always used, because when you do that, you can remember what his voice sounded like.

You stare at his name on the grave marker, trying to comprehend that his name IS on a headstone. How can that be?

You go places you used to be able to find him, looking for him…his place of work, the beach, his room, his car. But he isn’t there.

You smell his clothes. You wear his clothes. You draw near to his friends, because that’s as close as you can get to him now.

“Many waters cannot quench love, for love is strong as death.”
You look for comfort in scripture, and hang onto the promises of eternal life, reunions to come, God’s restoration of all things.
“Sorrow lasts for the night, but joy comes in the morning.” Morning will dawn, for me, in heaven.
“Those who sow in tears shall reap in joy, bringing their sheaves with them.”

You look for and cherish any little bit of his handwriting, or things that he gave you. It’s proof – proof that he was there. A living person wrote this…. a living person gave me this…
He was real. He was here.

He’s still real…..just not here.

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2 comments on “Michael”

  1. Thank you for sharing…

  2. I think you could compile a collection of writing for those who are grieving. You have perfectly captured a reality and the feelings that accompany it.


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